Protein nanomachines

All creatures on earth survive by monitoring and transforming their environments with the help of small proteins made of thousands of atoms. But diseases such as Alzheimer's and Parkinson's are caused by errors in proteins assembly. Hence it becomes important to understanding how a protein goes from being one thing to becoming another to form a unique assembled structure. In this context scientists of University of Montreal have visualized how a protein goes from a linear chain to a unique assembled structure.
Protein self-assembly
Proteins are made of long linear chains of amino acids which self-assemble extremely rapidly into a working nanomachine. Lipid bilayers which are the basic structural elements of biological membranes help self-assembly and provide environment for proteins to operate. Both DNA and protein molecules possess a number of intrinsic properties such as the site-specific molecular recognition among interacting protein molecules and template-directed self assembly of complementary DNA strands. 
Mechanical properties of certain protein complexes have enabled bionanotechnologists to make biosensor and nanosensors and templates for molecular mimicry and design. These characteristics make them excellent candidates for the assembly of dynamic nanostructures and nanodevices. Protein pathways often involve a series of proteins that act in successive order to yield a particular molecular “product” or perform a particular molecular function.
But the protein assembly process is not easy as a protein can change through chemical modifications or with age to take on different forms and functions. Understanding how a protein goes from being one thing to becoming another is the first step towards understanding and designing medical and environmental diagnostic sensors, drug synthesis and delivery.
In this direction scientists of University of Montreal have visualized how a protein goes from a linear chain to a unique assembled structure. This research has helped visualizing transient protein folding intermediates by tryptophan scanning mutagenesis.
Protein nanomachines
According to Nanobiology Laboratories Protonic NanoMachine Group, protein nanomachines have a unique and special ability to form three-dimensional structures and large complexes so that individual atoms take well-defined three-dimensional positions to perform specific and yet various functions in a highly precise manner. Self-organization helps in mass production of nanomachines and important for practical applications.
The researchers have developed protein nanomachines which work flexibly and precisely at the same time and is expected to produce much useful knowledge to eventually form a basis for design principles for making artificial nanomachines of practical use.

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